A Fitbit smartwatch for kids and all things CES 2018

It’s over. Probably one of the busiest weeks we’ll have here at Wareable this year. Until Baselworld, MWC, anything Apple related and IFA, that is.

The last seven days was all about CES, the tech show that pretty much sets the trends and shows off the wearables we (and you) will be pining to get hold of.

Read this:Best wearable tech at CES 2018

Many thought it would be a quiet show for all thing wearables, but actually there was a lot to talk about, and not just from the usual suspects. There has been a life away from what happened in Las Vegas, which could also prove to be big news for what goes down over the next eleven months.

So here’s my take on what happened in a big ol’ week in wearables.

A Fitbit smartwatch for kids you say…

Week in wearable: A Fitbit smartwatch for kids and all things CES 2018

Now this really would be interesting. Having ushered out its first smartwatch in 2017, James Park and co have already suggested there’s plans for more connected timepieces beyond the Ionic. So could one end up being worn by kids? According to sources that have spoken to Bloomberg, internal discussions have taken place with regards to the prospect of a Fitbit kids smartwatch.

There’s no indication how it will look or what it will do, but we imagine fitness tracking will be at the heart of any potential device. It may well follow what other kids smartwatch makers have done by including features like location tracking and the ability for parents to quickly establish contact with their kids when they are out and about. Making a wearable designed for younger users does of course with an entire new set of obstacles including making sure things like data privacy is water tight.

Right now, all we appear to know is that Fitbit have talked about it. Whether it becomes a thing is a whole different thing altogether.

Amazon’s big Alexa push with wearables and hearables

Week in wearable: A Fitbit smartwatch for kids and all things CES 2018

Technically this story dropped over the weekend but we are going to let that slide just on this occasion because it’s a biggie. If you believe the stats, Amazon’s smart assistant had a pretty big Christmas as Alexa found its way into a lot of homes of the festive period. Now the online retail giant wants to bring the same tech to more tech and it’s going to make that happen through its new Alexa Mobile Accessory Kit.

That Kit should make it easier for companies to add Alexa to wearables including smartwatches, headphones and pretty much anything else you can wear that you might want to talk into. We’ve already seen examples of this happening out at CES (more on that in a moment) and it’ll be fascinating to see whether the same Alexa/Google Assistant war we’re witnessing with smart speakers is going to replicate itself with wearables as well.

CES 2018

Week in wearable: A Fitbit smartwatch for kids and all things CES 2018

Okay, let’s get into it. CES happened, the Wareable team was out in Vegas and there was a lot to talk about. Everyone will have their take on how wearables fared at this year’s show. My take is that wearables continue to evolve and there’s still plenty of innovation happening in the space.

If you want to catch up on all of the announcements, then definitely head over to our dedicated news section. If you want a breakdown of the big headline grabbing stories, Garmin finally brought music support to its wearable family with the Forerunner 645 Music, HTC unveiled the Vive Pro, headset successor to the Vive and L’Oréal (yes, L’Oréal) unveiled a thumbnail-sized UV sensor that aims to keep you safe in the sun.

We’ve also picked out our wearable faves from the show and if you want to know how we picked out the best in show, you definitely give this week’s special CES edition of the podcast to hear myself, Hugh, Sophie and Conor talk tech, Vegas and more.

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